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  1. Mike Drabik permalink
    February 3, 2016 8:32 am

    I’m totally jaded here. Despise both parties. Hate the two-party system as anachronistic and out of step with the people, therefore. Am not L or C. Vote, but in the presidential elections – have voted for years for a candidate I knew wasn’t electable because I couldn’t vote for candidates that only represent a small part of what I believe. Long for leaders like Theodore Roosevelt or FDR to step to the fore – ‘fraid there isn’t anyone in America like them at all.

    So, caucuses, primaries, conventions, etc . . . don’t mean a rat’s . . . to me.

    Absolutely do not want Trump for Prez, though. Shutter to think of what’ll will happen if he is elected and what people who feel like me might do if it does happen.

    I love our Republic and will not stand idly by and let this tyrant blithely take the highest seat in the land and one of the most powerful in the world.

    I’ve no faith in the current political system to keep him out. If he does become Prez – the only political solution I see is ” . . . to alter or to abolish . . .” whatever he does as our government’s head. The only question for me: how to stop him quickly without becoming immoral?

    • February 6, 2016 4:18 pm

      I suppose the best way to stop Trump is to urge anyone you know in South Carolina and New Hampshire not to vote for him! Meanwhile, keep exposing him for what he is. (Have you read David Cruz Uribe’s post, “Catholics Should Oppose Donald Trump?”)

      I understand that you are tired of the system as it currently is. I agree that two parties are not enough, and I’ve often voted for minor-party candidates (particularly when I lived in New York State). That said, it was exciting to be in Iowa for the famous caucus.

      My advice to you would be to remain active in the civil society – your church and whatever volunteer or community organizations you support. Be a joiner. Work for change at the local level while supporting global charities or causes that you believe in. This is where change begins.

  2. February 20, 2016 4:09 pm

    I notice whether it’s the United States border or the migrant situation in Europe that the Roman Catholic Church insists that Western Nations take in millions of migrants from the developing world. The Church claims to advocate for the dignity of each human being but a big part of living a dignified life is living in a community. Whether these communities are neighborhoods, towns, or whole nations no group of people should be required to take in another group of people. People overwhelmingly prefer to live in communities with people like themselves. In fact, studies have shown over and over that increased diversity actually lowers social cohesion.

    I can understand why the Church doesn’t support border security on America’s Southern Border. The Church sees Latinos as the future of the Church in the United States and is only looking out for its organizational interests (like big agriculture or the meat packing industry). But the migrant situation in Europe is another story. Flooding Europe with Muslim migrants, of mostly fighting age men, is inimical to the Church’s organizational future. I notice the Church likes to site Exodus 22:21 when defending its position on forced migration. In this case the Church is worse than even the evangelicals in taking a verse out of context. Here it is:

    “You shall not wrong a stranger or oppress him, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.”

    This verse means if someone comes to your camp or town or you come along a stranger on the road that you shouldn’t rob or beat him. It means if a sojourner needs a place for the night that you should at least offer him your stable to sleep in and toss him yesterday’s bread. This expectation of offering food and lodging to a stranger passing through can be found in many cultures. It has nothing to do with taking in huge numbers of people and being forced-integrated with them. If the ancient Israelites were forced-integrated with the peoples surrounding them there would have been no Israelites over time.

    The Roman Catholic Church (and the others too Lutherans, Methodists, Episcopalians, etc.) need to stop using the virtue of Christian charity as a pretext to carry out the globalist agenda. Human beings are social creatures and the choice in community is nearly as important as whom we chose to make a family with. Although I suppose it’s a matter of time before the Church and her globalist allies start forcing families to take in people as well?

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