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Companions on the Journey: Eid, Pray, Love

April 2, 2015

Over the past month and a half, Christians all over the world have been on a pilgrimage. Lent is a time of prayer and contemplation, fasting and charity, a time of striving to grow in our faith and closeness to Christ. I only just now learned that as we’ve been on this journey, we’ve been accompanied by some of our Muslim brothers and sisters. It’s amazing to know that we are not alone:

 http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-32094307

As we accompany Christ through his Last Supper, his horrendous night in Gethsemane and his Passion, may we remember that this journey is shared by many throughout the world.

I wish you all a blessed Triduum.

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8 Comments
  1. Agellius permalink
    April 2, 2015 5:41 pm

    Very nice to see. May God bless them.

  2. April 3, 2015 8:02 am

    Here’s another great video to go with it: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-32141924

    • trellis smith permalink
      April 6, 2015 2:20 pm

      I really don’t understand the purposes of any of this, it just seem a glossing over, of creating a false and superficial narrative of “islamaphobia ” especially the political hijab stunt.

      • April 6, 2015 8:57 pm

        Trellis, I think it’s about empathy. To wear a hijab in a predominantly non-Muslim society isn’t easy – it’s bound to get you some stares and questioning looks, just as being marked with ashes on Ash Wednesday does for Catholics in a non-Catholic society. I see this as about trying to put oneself in someone else’s shoes and trying to experience life from their point of view – to whatever tiny extent this is possible.

        • trellis smith permalink
          April 6, 2015 9:08 pm

          Maybe we can go headless to sympathize with the real victims.

  3. David Cruz-Uribe, SFO permalink
    April 3, 2015 11:39 am

    The priest who is filling in in my parish for the Triduum is from Ghana, and he was telling me that the Muslims in Ghana have the custom that on the two Eids they share their feasts with their Christian neighbors. The Christians have started to reciprocate, bringing food to their Muslim neighbors on Christmas.

  4. April 7, 2015 8:54 am

    In my opinion interreligious and ecumenical dialogue is a gift from God. But it does beg the question, ‘Who speaks for Whom?’…which in turn begs the question of whether we are representing our faith tradition or making personal statements that are often risky, unwise and lead to contradictions.

    I find DCU’s comment inspiring and helpful because it implies the actions of a group of faithful sharing and reaching out. Presumably some consensus is achieved, which implies the presence of the Holy Spirit. On the other hand, ‘hijab mom’ seems to be making personal statements (even though she picked this up in social media). I found it disconcerting that she alarmed her own children and didn’t prepare them properly. I also wonder if it wouldn’t have been better to bring this up with her faith community and ask her sisters to join and foster a conversion among those closest to her.

  5. April 8, 2015 9:31 am

    JMD said: I think it’s about empathy. To wear a hijab in a predominantly non-Muslim society isn’t easy – it’s bound to get you some stares and questioning looks, just as being marked with ashes on Ash Wednesday does for Catholics in a non-Catholic society. I see this as about trying to put oneself in someone else’s shoes and trying to experience life from their point of view – to whatever tiny extent this is possible.

    All of this is fine, but how does this connect with Lent?

    I watched the video a few times and gleaned several of the comments on her blog or twitter account. This was a social experiment and not a penitential activity (in some sense it may have been narcissistic). Indeed, that’s part of the problem in that she can’t discern the difference. It certainly caused much consternation and perhaps more among Muslim women than Christian.

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