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Rudy’s “evolution” on abortion

November 27, 2007
by

Courtesy of CNN:

As mayor, Giuliani personally signed a proclamation designating “Roe v. Wade Anniversary Day” on the 25th anniversary of the landmark abortion rights ruling.

Now, as a presidential candidate, Giuliani has said, “I’m against abortion — I hate it.”

Conlin said she never heard anything like that when Giuliani was in office.

He never seemed to have a struggle with the issue as mayor,” she said.

He was very proudly pro-choice.”

. . . .

As mayor, he offered no such reservations: “I am pro-choice and pro-gay rights.”

. . . .

As mayor, Giuliani supported taxpayer-financed abortions for poor women, a position he reiterated in a 1997 National Abortion and Reproductive Rights Action League candidate questionnaire and again in an interview with CNN seven months ago.

“If it would deprive someone of a constitutional right, yes — I mean, if that’s the status of the law, then I would, yes,” he told CNN. But a day later, as Christian conservatives spread word of the CNN interview, the Giuliani campaign scrambled to clarify its position. “I’d want to see it decided on a state-by-state basis,” Giuliani said of the taxpayer-funding issue.

In the 1997 NARAL questionnaire, Giuliani also opposed restrictions on minors receiving abortions. But now he says he backs parental notification as long as a judge can waive the requirement in some circumstances.

. . . .

I have not supported [a ban on partial-birth abortion] and I do not see my position on that changing,” Giuliani told CNN at the time. But it has changed. After an April Supreme Court ruling upholding such a ban, Giuliani said, “I must say, Justice [Anthony] Kennedy’s opinion convinced me even more that my support for the ban is a correct one.” Kelli Conlin shakes her head at that. “He spoke at one of our events one time about that legislation and he was very intelligent about it,” she said, recalling Giuliani talking about how in those rare cases where life of the mother was in jeopardy that doctors needed the authority to make quick decisions. “He owes the American people an explanation of why he’s flip flopped so dramatically,” Conlin said.

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17 Comments
  1. November 27, 2007 2:20 pm

    Ask Romney the same questions.

  2. Blackadder permalink
    November 27, 2007 3:07 pm

    Romney says that his position on abortion changed when he had to deal with the stem cell issue as governor, and was personally confronted with the implications of his position. Rudy claims not to have changed his position. They might both be lying, but Rudy certainly is.

  3. X-Cathedra permalink
    November 27, 2007 4:15 pm

    ………………….And Robertson’s backing this guy???? Nothing like consistency.

  4. November 27, 2007 4:31 pm

    “He owes the American people an explanation on why he’s flip-flopped so dramatically.”

    Huh? Did I miss something? Since when is going from adamently pro-abortion to only slightly adamently pro-abortion considered a “dramatic flip-flop”?

  5. November 27, 2007 4:33 pm

    If it comes down to Hillary and Rudy, though, a lot of you folks would vote for this jerk, wouldn’t ya? ;)

  6. November 27, 2007 4:38 pm

    Not me. I’ll vote third party.

  7. November 27, 2007 4:40 pm

    “If it comes down to Hillary and Rudy, though, a lot of you folks would vote for this jerk, wouldn’t ya? ;)”

    I can’t speak for others, but I wouldn’t. As James Dobson noted, a victory by Republicans with Guliani means the complete marginalization of the pro-life cause. Hillary would be a costly lesson for Republicans, but if they insist on RG, the expected consequences.

  8. Blackadder permalink
    November 27, 2007 4:41 pm

    If it comes down to Hillary and Rudy, I might have to consider anarchism again. :)

  9. November 27, 2007 4:55 pm

    If it comes down to Hillary and Rudy, I might have to consider anarchism again. :)

    That’s what I like to hear! :)

  10. Donald R. McClarey permalink
    November 27, 2007 6:49 pm

    “If it comes down to Hillary and Rudy, though, a lot of you folks would vote for this jerk, wouldn’t ya? ;)”

    Not me, although I have no doubt that Hillary is a bigger jerkette than Guiliani is a jerk. (Just ask Bill.) I will not vote for someone who supports abortion on demand, no matter if they have an R after their name.

  11. November 27, 2007 7:21 pm

    I have no doubt that Hillary is a bigger jerkette than Guiliani is a jerk.

    On what basis?

  12. November 27, 2007 7:34 pm

    On what basis do you just assume that “a lot of you folks would vote for this jerk”? Many of us have categorically ruled out voting for Giuliani under any circumstances.

  13. Blackadder permalink
    November 27, 2007 7:48 pm

    In a contest of jerkiness, Rudy wins hands down (he is from New York, after all). To some this is one of his selling points.

  14. November 28, 2007 12:20 am

    On what basis do you just assume that “a lot of you folks would vote for this jerk”? Many of us have categorically ruled out voting for Giuliani under any circumstances.

    That’s certainly wonderful to hear. And it’s encouraging to hear that, should Rudy and Hillary win their nominations, that many of you would vote third party. We’ll see how this plays out, I guess. I hope, if it does end up R vs H, that Catholic voters will prove me wrong.

  15. Donald R. McClarey permalink
    November 28, 2007 12:39 am

    Mrs. Clinton’s jerkette factor is well-established. Here is a quote from an interview that Frontline conducted with Dee Dee Myers early this year:

    Yeah. And I think because not only would she sort of humiliate you in front of your colleagues or whoever happened to be around. It wasn’t like she did it every day. I found that she wasn’t the most direct person. Although that was very direct, that to me was the exception rather than the rule. Hillary tended to kind of campaign against people behind their back, and that was certainly my experience. She was not happy with me, but she never confronted me. She never had a conversation with me about it. She would go call Leon in and yell at him and then he’d have to call me in and say, “Mrs. Clinton is really upset about X. You said Y, and she disagrees with that, and you know, she wants you to fix it,” or whatever. As opposed to her picking up the phone and calling me. Sometimes it’s appropriate, I think, to go through the chief of staff because it’s the chain of command. Maybe she’s talking to him about six things and one of them is me. But there were times when I thought she should have dealt with me directly and she didn’t.

    …I didn’t respect that. If you have a problem with me or anybody else, it doesn’t mean she shouldn’t try achieve whatever outcome she wanted to achieve. But I think there is a certain grace and I just think it’s a bit better politics and personnel management to be direct.”

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/clinton/interviews/myers3.html

    Clinton staffers tended to love Bill, some in more ways than one. Most of them feared Hillary.

  16. November 28, 2007 3:23 am

    Sounds more like intelligent design than evolution.

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